Competition Boutique Continues London Buildout With Macfarlanes Hire

by Hannah Roberts

Euclid Law has boosted its London ranks with another partner hire nearly a year after it brought on board a heavyweight partner from Cooley.

Competition lawyers are poised for a deluge of trade-related work since the U.K.’s exit from the European Union at the start of the year, with many firms bolstering their benches as a result.

Michael advises clients on a broad range of UK, EU and global antitrust matters, including cartels, abuse of dominance, merger control, state aid, competition litigation and general EU law across a wide number of industries. His experience spans sectors including TMT, energy, manufacturing, retail, leisure and transport.

Oliver Bretz: “I am delighted that someone of Michael’s quality and experience is joining Euclid. We are the pre-eminent competition boutique and our recent additions of Becket McGrath from Cooley and internal promotion of Natalie Greenwood are a testament to our market growth and positioning. We are delighted to welcome Michael to this fantastic team”. 

Michael Reiss: “I’m excited to be joining Euclid because of the top quality work and the calibre of the firm’s clients. Over the past twelve years I’ve worked on some complex merger control, investigations and litigation matters, and I’m looking forward to contributing to the growth of the practice. Moreover, on a personal level, they are a great team of colleagues to have.”

Read the full Law.com UK|Legal Week article here.

UK FDI bill consultation responses will aim to narrow sector scope amid new agency capacity concerns

by PaRR

Responses to the UK government’s consultation on mandatory notification under the National Security and Investment Bill published yesterday (11 November) will seek to narrow the proposed sector definitions, lawyers told this news service.

There are also concerns that a new agency within the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) tasked with policing the regime will be inundated with deal cases, lawyers noted.

“It is absolutely crucial […] to further refine the list,” Samantha Mobley, competition partner at Baker McKenzie said. Given proposed “draconian penalties” for failure to file, definitions have to be “crystal clear”, she argued.

The government has identified 17 such “core sectors”: advanced materials, advanced robotics, artificial intelligence (AI), civil nuclear, communications, computing hardware, critical suppliers to government, critical suppliers to the emergency services, cryptographic authentication, data infrastructure, defence, energy, engineering biology, military and dual use, quantum technologies, satellite and space technologies and transport.

[…]
Adding new, very broad sectors such as communications, data infrastructure, energy, computing hardware and transport into the existing oversight regime under the Enterprise Act (2002) “has the potential to extend the reach [of FDI screening] considerably,” said Becket McGrath.

To read the full PaRR article: https://lnkd.in/dU3m46A